Affordability of Healthy Eating

Definition:

BC Centre for Disease Control – Population and Public Health: Food Security 

This report is for anyone interested in household food insecurity and who wants to assess the affordability of a healthy diet. It provides food cost data from across BC based on the National Nutritious Food Basket. The report also provides background on household food insecurity, the related health implications and calls to action to address household food insecurity. 

Methods and Limitations:

Food costing involves the biannual collection of food prices in grocery stores across BC in order to calculate the average monthly cost of an adequately nutritious diet. Regional health authority staff and volunteers collect food prices. Food costing was conducted in May/June 2022 using the National Nutritious Food Basket developed by Health Canada.   

The food costing methodology largely excludes remote and Indigenous communities, where there are few full-service grocery stores. It also does not capture costs such as transportation or cost of accessing traditional foods. BCCDC is leading a project to learn more about food cost and impacts of climate change in remote Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

Source(s):

http://www.bccdc.ca/Documents/Food_Costing_in_BC_2022_Report_FINAL.pdf

http://www.bccdc.ca/pop-public-health/Documents/food-costing-BC-2017.pdf

http://www.bccdc.ca/pop-public-health/Documents/2015%20Food%20Costing%20in%20BC%20-%20FINAL.pdf

 
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Affordability of Healthy Eating in the Sustainable Development Goals

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2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

It is time to rethink how we grow, share and consume our food.

If done right, agriculture, forestry and fisheries can provide nutritious food for all and generate decent incomes, while supporting people-centred rural development and protecting the environment.

Right now, our soils, freshwater, oceans, forests and biodiversity are being rapidly degraded. Climate change is putting even more pressure on the resources we depend on, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods. Many rural women and men can no longer make ends meet on their land, forcing them to migrate to cities in search of opportunities.

A profound change of the global food and agriculture system is needed if we are to nourish today’s 815 million hungry and the additional 2 billion people expected by 2050.

The food and agriculture sector offers key solutions for development, and is central for hunger and poverty eradication.