Inter and Intra Provincial Migration (Ages 20-34)

Definition:

Net Interprovincial and Intraprovincial Migration, ages 20-34

Methods and Limitations:

Intraprovincial migration represents movement within a province or territory to another geographic area within that province or territory. (Example, someone moving from Vancouver to Victoria is considered an intraprovincial migrant).  

Net intraprovincial migration represents the total number of people moving into a geographic area from the same province, minus the number of people leaving a geographic area to a different geographic area in the same province.

It is important to note that interprovincial and intraprovincial migration are one dimension of population change. Immigration (coming from a different country), emigration (leaving to a different country), births and deaths are other aspects of population change that are not accounted for in this indicator.

Population estimates based on the Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) 2016 as delineated in the 2016 Census.

The estimates for net interprovincial migration are preliminary for 2021/2022 and final up to 2020/2021.

The estimates for net intraprovincial migration are preliminary for 2021/2022 and final up to 2020/2021. For Quebec’s census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, preliminary and final data (from 2001/2002) are taken from the estimates of “l’Institut de la statistique du Québec” (ISQ). In rare instances, it may have been necessary to modify ISQ’s estimates in order to avoid generating negative populations with the cohort component approach. For all census agglomerations (with the exception of those listed hereinafter), the method to calculate intraprovincial migration is not the same for periods starting in 2011/2012 and for past periods. For the following census agglomerations, the method is not the same for periods starting in 2016/2017: Gander (N.L.), Sainte-Marie (Que.), Arnprior (Ont.), Carleton Place (Ont.), Wasaga Beach (Ont.), Winkler (Man.), Weyburn (Sask.), Nelson (B.C.). Thus, historical trends for intraprovincial migration must be interpreted with caution for census agglomerations.

Source(s):

Statistics Canada. Table 17-10-0140-01 Components of population change by census division, 2016 boundaries.

Statistics Canada. Table 17-10-0136-01 Components of population change by census metropolitan area and census agglomeration, 2016 boundaries.

Statistics Canada. Table 17-10-0138-01 Components of population change by economic region, 2016 boundaries.

 
Loading

Inter and Intra Provincial Migration (Ages 20-34) in the Sustainable Development Goals

Click on the SDG to reveal more information

No SDGs